Archives for October 2013

1912 Blackburn CAD Plan

 

I added a page today on my CAD plan for the 1912 Blackburn Type D Monoplane. Check out the discussion and video here.

Front view of the Blackburn monoplane

Front view of the Blackburn monoplane

The Blackburn is one of my favorite designs. The aircraft is one of the earliest British designs. The original crashed in 1914 and was forgotten until discovered in a barn in 1938. Fully restored, the Blackburn flies as part of the Shuttleworth Collection, and remains the oldest airworthy British aircraft.

Detail of the Blackburn underside

Detail of the Blackburn underside

The Blackburn is easy to build from balsa and plywood. The design uses a plywood fuselage frame to mount the engine, battery, landing year, electronics and wing tubes. The rest of the structure is essentially built around this frame, offering an innovative method to add strength with a minimum of weight.

The Blackburn RC model uses three channels of control for rudder, elevator and throttle. The wings offer plenty of surface area for slow and relaxing flights. The model makes for a perfect first build of a scale RC airplane.

Full scale Blackburn Monoplane touching down

Full scale Blackburn Monoplane touching down

The popularity of the full scale Blackburn Type D leads to all sorts of pictures and videos on the internet from which you can detail your variant. Several modelers have shared pictures with me of their Blackburn. One RC pilot from the Netherlands constructed his Blackburn from foam.  All of the builds look great and fly exceptionally well.

CAD plans are available here for the Blackburn. The plans are on 8.5 by 11 inch paper, with enlargement ratios shown on the plans. I’ll also send you the CAD files. You will need a CAD program installed on your computer to access these files, but this will allow you to print a full size copy directly with a plotter.

 

Nose detail of the Blackburn RC model plane

Nose detail of the Blackburn RC model plane

Steve’s Blackburn Type D

 

One of the rewarding aspects of designing radio control model aircraft is sharing the plans with other modelers and seeing how they recreate and improve upon your original design.

Blackburn landing gear details

Steve’s Blackburn landing gear details

The full scale Blackburn Type D Monoplane is one of the earliest British aircraft, first taking to the air in 1912. The original Blackburn crashed in 1914 and was put into storage for a number of years. The aircraft was rediscovered in 1938, fully restored and flies during calm days as part of the Shuttleworth historic aircraft collection. This remarkable plane remains the oldest airworthy British aircraft.

The Blackburn is one of my favorite RC models. The airplane has generous wing and tail surface areas that combine to allow slow and relaxing flight. The aircraft exudes character with its clean lines and distinctive landing gear arrangement. In short, the Blackburn makes an ideal candidate for a radio control aircraft.  Purchase a set of Blackburn plans here and build one for yourself!

Front view of the Blackburn with rigging in place

Front view of the Blackburn with rigging in place

Numerous modelers have built my design of the 1912 Blackburn Type D Monoplane. The most recent is by Steve. Steve did a superb job with every aspect of his project. It is most informative to follow his construction, modification and flight progress at RC Groups.

One of the pleasant aspects regarding building from plans is the ease with making changes and improvements to the original design. The Blackburn has a fairly simple layout. Steve did an insightful job modifying various aspects such as the wing structure, equipment placement, rigging and scale covering to create his outstanding variant.

Blackburn nose section under construction

Blackburn nose section under construction

For my Blackburn I adapted the wing structure employed by the Sig Demoiselle. This approach used ¼ inch balsa dowels for the fore and aft wing spars, plugging into metal tubes on the fuselage. This was an easy and convenient method to have removable wings for an aircraft of this size.

Steve elected to make his wings much stronger with rectangular upper and lower balsa spars reinforced at the fuselage end with a vertical grain balsa web, creating a rigid spar box arrangement. This is an ideal method to glue in place metal tubes to securely hold the wing in place. I will use this approach for future electric RC model airplane designs.

Steve also added detail options such as metallic covering for the cowl and precise silver solder joints for the landing gear, wing post and tail skid. These seemingly minor touches make all the difference in the finish product from both a structural strength and appearance point of view.

Steve’s building and design skills are displayed in every image. The result is an attractive semi-scale model of an historic airplane, and one that is a pleasure to fly.

Detail of the Blackburn's wing with metal tube fuselage attachment points

Detail of the Blackburn’s wing with metal tube fuselage attachment points