Brian’s Blackburn

Side view of Brian's completed Blackburn

Side view of Brian’s completed Blackburn

Brian recently purchased a set of Blackburn CAD plans, completed his model and was kind enough to share the results. Executive summary:  Brian’s Blackburn looks great!

Detail of Blackburn cockpit and after servo installation

Detail of Blackburn cockpit and after servo installation

The 1912 Blackburn Type D Monoplane was one of the first aircraft designed and built by an Englishman and then flown in the United Kingdom. With its front mounted engine and aft tail surfaces, the Blackburn has a surprisingly modern layout for an aircraft conceived just nine years after the Wright brothers’ first flight.  The generous wing and control surface areas as well as the substantial nose and tail moments make for an ideal radio control model aircraft.

Front view of the Blackburn, ready for takeoff

Front view of the Blackburn, ready for takeoff

Brian’s reports that his model finished out a bit tail heavy. Brian wisely added the correct amount of nose weight to bring the model with the proper center of gravity range.  It is absolutely critical that any aircraft balance within the correct center of gravity range prior to any test flights.  A model will be uncontrollable if flown with a CG out of limits as there is simply not enough control authority to override the resulting uncommanded pitch changes.

Top view of Brian's Blackburn showing rigging and ample wing and tail areas

Top view of Brian’s Blackburn showing rigging and ample wing and tail areas

As to why the model came out tail heavy, there is no certain answer. What I do is to always attempt to “build in lightness” as I construct the model.  I try to employ the lightest weight balsa for any fuselage structure aft of the cockpit, to include the tail surfaces, to minimize the possibility of a tail heavy aircraft.

Nice job with simulated spoke wheels and landing gear arrangement

Nice job with simulated spoke wheels and landing gear arrangement

Sometimes, despite your best efforts, a model will come out slightly tail heavy. One of the reasons I selected the Blackburn is the generous nose moment (distance of the propeller to the center of gravity) to make the most use of any weight added to the nose to move the center of gravity into the correct place.

Custom built foam carry case

Custom built foam carry case

The slight added weight for Brian’s model (about five ounces) should have no appreciable impact to the Blackburn flight characteristics. The full scale Blackburn had ample wing area, as the aircraft of those initial days were woefully underpowered due to the early state of aviation engine technology.  In a sense many of these early flyers were powered gliders.

This plentiful wing area makes the addition of some extra weight essentially not noticeable. The added mass will likely make for a smoother flying aircraft in the end.

Detail of custom built foam carrying case for the Blackburn Monoplane

Detail of custom built foam carrying case for the Blackburn Monoplane

Brian also took the extra step of constructing a custom designed foam carrying case for his Blackburn. As per the plans, the Blackburn’s wings friction fit into metal tubes mounted to the fuselage.  This makes it a snap to disassemble the model for ease of transport.

Brian did a superb job of tailoring his foam carrying case for the Blackburn. This is a great idea I had not thought of, and I will for sure employ this approach for future model aircraft designs.

Brian, thanks again for sharing the photos of your finished aircraft and carrying case.  Good luck with the test flights!